Crackers at Christmas

The summer holidays are over, the schools are back and, increasingly, our focus is now on Christmas. We Brits love our Christmas; don’t we just? But, as much as we might love it, Christmas creates huge distortions in the annual trading cycle. For some businesses, for instance many high street retailers, the run up to Christmas and the January sales account for a large slice of their annual sales; so, if they don’t do well over the December/January period, their budgets are knocked for six. For other businesses, probably the majority, sales in the run up to Christmas fall away dramatically, order books run down very quickly and, during the aftermath of Christmas, output is depressed until order books recover. Furthermore, a full month’s overheads are incurred during December, whilst trading is restricted to about three weeks. So you can see why many businesses find their cash flow very stretched at that time of year and why January to March is the danger period, when many weak businesses fail.

So, if your business is one of those that are hit badly at Christmas and the early part of the New Year, what can you do about it?

Well what you can’t do is fight it. It’s part of our British culture and there’s not much you can do to change that. The real issue is how you manage your business through this period with the least amount of damage.

The first action that you need to consider is right now. During the autumn you need to build your order book as much as you can. Increase your advertising, while your market is active, and maximise your flow of enquiries/leads. At this time of year, you’re targeting customers, who are a long way through the buying cycle and are ready to buy; so create some urgency by running a time related offer that requires your product or service to be delivered before Christmas. The orders you take need to be well priced, giving you good margins that will sustain your business and deliver some decent profits. So don’t be tempted to cut prices. The offer you run needs to be product related – an upgraded spec: a free extra etc. And what you’re looking to do is make it something, whose perceived value is greater than its true cost to the business.

However, at some point prior to Christmas, you’ll cross a threshold. Market activity will start to drop off very quickly and your order book will reach the point where you can no longer offer a pre-Christmas delivery. There’s no clear rule as to which of these will come first; but whichever does come first should trigger a complete change of tactics.

Your advertising must change to target a different type of customer. You’re now looking for customers, for whom buying your product or service isn’t influenced by the timing of Christmas. You’re after bargain hunters looking for good deals. They’re not tempted by free upgrades; for them, it’s all about price. You want orders that are placed before Christmas but with delivery in the New Year. The incentive is a significant discount that makes your product or service exceptional value for money. Whilst the market may be generally inactive, serious bargain hunters, with a genuine interest in your product or service, will still respond, if the deal is good enough. For you, low priced business is better than no business; and your aim is to keep your business’s output up, in the aftermath of Christmas. So not only is this cut price offer for a limited period in the run up to Christmas, it must also stipulate that the product or service must be delivered within a limited time frame after Christmas; perhaps by the end of January or maybe February. The actual cut off will depend on the length of your delivery period. Your objective will be to attract enough low priced volume to keep your output up, in the immediate aftermath of Christmas but not to impede the delivery of higher priced orders that start to build up in the New Year. It’s a tricky balancing act designed to fill a gap; and you probably won’t get it 100% right. But even so, it’s far better to have this type of strategy in place than to let your business be a helpless victim of market distortions caused by the British being crackers at Christmas.

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