Better Times Ahead

Most economic indicators are now pointing to a recovery.

• The economy is growing
• Manufacturing and services are up
• Unemployment is continuing to fall
• Inflation is below 2%
• Living standards are beginning to recover, albeit slowly

Under these circumstances, business confidence is on the increase. However, over the last few years, small and medium sized businesses have had a tough time.

• Profits have been low
• Balance sheets have weakened
• Cash has been under pressure
• Investment in plant, equipment and infrastructure has been supressed.

So, it’s inevitable that many businesses remain very cautious. Nevertheless, as markets continue to recover, businesses do need to gear up; and being over cautious is likely to lead to lost opportunities and being left behind by your competitors.

So Think About Your Business

• Is your business model working effectively and still relevant to current and future market conditions; or does it need to adapt?
• Is your marketing strategy working; or have you been left behind by the fast moving on-line revolution?
• Are your products/services state of the art; or are they getting tired?
• Are your processes and systems as efficient as they need to be; or are they becoming cumbersome?
• Is your productivity as good as it should be; or are your direct costs too high?
• Are your quality standards under effective control; or are you getting too many complaints?
• Is your organisation structure fit for purpose; or has it become dysfunctional?
• Are you supporting your employees effectively; or are too many underperforming?
• Are your customers happy; or are they drifting to your competitors?

In all honesty, very few businesses can tick all of these boxes. Sadly, some can tick very few, whilst the majority fall somewhere between these two extremes and, therefore, have the opportunity to raise their game.

How Can You Raise Your Game?

As an owner, director or senior manager of a small or medium sized business, the first thing you need to do, is to be honest with yourself about the state of your business; good or bad. Then remember that you don’t necessarily have all the skills and experience needed to address the weaknesses your business might have, or exploit the opportunities that the market might present. Recognising that you aren’t superman or superwoman is a strength in itself.

Next, think about how you can spend more time working “on the business” and less time working “in the business”. That probably means more delegation of responsibilities; and remember that a failure to delegate is often more about your own inclination to micromanage, rather than the lack of competency of the people, to whom you should be delegating.

At this point, you can start to take a more considered view about the strengths and weaknesses that your business has, and you can be more objective about the opportunities and threats that exist. So you can now start to plan. Look at where you want to take the business and assess the resources you’ll need. Compare these with the resources you have. Then consider how, and over what time frame, you can acquire the resources you need but don’t have, as well as offload the resources you have but don’t need. This is all about developing a properly focussed strategy; and, once you have this, you can start to work on a more detailed business plan.

Now back to the point about your own skills and experience. For many owners, directors and senior managers of small and medium sized businesses, strategic planning and change management isn’t familiar territory; and if that is true for you, you have three options.

The first is do nothing, carry on as before and chance that everything will turn out alright in the end. It’s high risk but it might just work.

The second is to go it alone and to try and find your way through. If you do that, you may get there eventually, but the chances are you’ll take some wrong turns, get lost, have to retrace your tracks and end up taking much longer to reach your destination, whilst incurring substantially higher costs on the way.

The third is to hire a guide; a business advisor, familiar with the territory, who can steer you to your destination via the shortest and least costly route. Business advisors cost money; but the right business advisor will cost you a fraction of what it would otherwise cost, by the time you’ve taken several wrong turns en-route.

The changing economic climate means that small and medium sized businesses, which have battened down the hatches for the last few years, can increasingly start to take a more proactive position. But most markets are likely to remain highly competitive; so focused strategies, well developed business plans and ever increasing levels of operational excellence are essential to long term sustainability.

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